Traditional Chanukoh Foods

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15 Dec 2008 04:02 #770 by rallisw
Traditional Chanukoh Foods was created by rallisw
What were the traditional foods for Chanukoh?

I understand that one traditionally eats foods cooked in oil as a zaycher to the nes.

My parents would make "Kartofel Pfannkuchen" Potato pancakes. They differ from the traditional Latkes in that they're made using raw potatoes rather than cooked.

The eating of Sufgoniyous, where did it originate?

Any other foods I may not be aware of?

Rallis

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15 Dec 2008 05:02 #773 by Michael
Replied by Michael on topic Traditional Chanukoh Foods
There were many Chanukoh foods, every place had its own special foods according to the taste and the products available. We do see in the ר"ן that one should eat milk foods, and this was accepted in פרובינציא, and later in Ashkenaz too.

Michael FRBSH

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15 Dec 2008 05:15 #774 by golusyekke
Replied by golusyekke on topic Traditional Chanukoh Foods
The minhag was to eat goose and to save the fat for pesach.

golusyekke

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16 Nov 2009 14:58 #1500 by rallisw
Replied by rallisw on topic Traditional Chanukoh Foods
There is a Bukhharian fable, which says the first sufganiya was a sweet given to Adam and Eve as compensation after their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. He says the word sufganiya comes from the Hebrew word, sof (meaning end), gan (meaning garden) and Ya (meaning God). Thus the word means, the end of God's garden.
This fable was created at the beginning of the 20th century, since sufganiya is a new Hebrew word coined by pioneers.
Some say sufganiyot, which means sponge like, are reminiscent of the sweet, spongy cookie called sufganne, a fried dough, popular along the Mediterranean since the time of the Maccabees. Hebrew dictionaries say the word actually comes from the Greek word, sufgan, meaning puffed and fried.
John Cooper, author of "Eat and Be Satisfied-A Social History of Jewish Food" has another theory. He says Christians in Europe ate deep-fried pastries on New Year's Eve, and Christians in Berlin ate jelly doughnuts. From them, German Jews started eating apricot-filled doughnuts. When they immigrated to Palestine in the 1930s, they encouraged the population to eat the jelly doughnuts for Hanukkah.
The doughnuts are said to have three characteristics: 1) they are round like the wheel of fortune; 2) they have to be looked at for what is inside not for their external qualities; and 3) they cannot be enjoyed the same way twice.

Rallis

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17 Nov 2009 00:41 #1501 by DDelaney
Replied by DDelaney on topic Traditional Chanukoh Foods
My Grandmother, whose family was from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, said they would have fried fish schnitzel with pilsner beer on the first night of Chanukah (unless the first night was Shabbos) also potato pancakes.
She also remembers, cheese danish, cherry cheese danish, cheese kreplach, and cheese latkes. On Shabbos Chanukah they would have duck or goose. They would also have baked potatoes topped with fried onions. Sometimes they would have lamb, especially if Shabbos Chanukah was also Rosh Chodesh. They would have a more elaborate than usual melavah malkah motzai Shabbos of Chanukah. (Usually they were not particularly strict about melavah malkah.) They would also have beer motzai Shabbos Chanukah.

David

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